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Trucking Statistics - A grim reality

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration cites these harrowing numbers:

In 2009, 3,380 people were killed and 74,000 peope were injured in crashes with large trucks.
TOTAL KILLED & INJURED:  77,380

In 2008 there were 9,006,738 registered large trucks in the United States, and they traveled 227,458 million miles.

Large trucks accounted for 7 percent of the vehicles in fatal crashes, of all crashes in the U.S. in 2009.

The most common initial point of impact in large truck crashes is head-on crashes.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration defines a large truck as a truck with gross vehicle weight rating greater than 10,000 pounds.

According to the Center for National Truck and Bus Statistics, 87.1 percent of fatal accident involvements with large trucks occur in “normal” (i.e., no precipitation) weather conditions.

Statistics from the Center for National Truck and Bus Statistics:

2.7% of truck drivers involved in a fatal traffic accident had been drinking.

Drug use was reported for 1.3% of truck drivers in a fatal crash.

1.5% of truck drivers involved in a fatal accident were recorded as drowsy or asleep.

Failure to stay in lane was the most common driver factor recorded (12.6%), followed by driving too fast (8.4%), inattentive (5.8%), and failure to yield (4.3%).

Cellular phone in use was cited for 0.1% of drivers.

60.3% of truck drivers had no driver factors recorded.

Drivers of 26.2% of Intrastate trucks and 14.7% of Interstate trucks had been driving one hour or less at the time of the accident.
 

 



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